Fifteen months ago, the armed wing of Lebanon's Hezbollah party, listed as a terrorist organization by the United States and most other Western countries, attacked Israel's northern border, capturing two Israeli soldiers and killing eight more [They say in retaliation]. Israel replied with a month of massive air attacks all across Lebanon that destroyed much of the country's infrastructure, leveled a good deal of south Beirut, and killed around a thousand Lebanese civilians.

Washington, London, Ottawa and some other Western capitals insisted that this was a reasonable and proportionate response, and shielded Israel from intense diplomatic pressure to stop the attacks even when Israel launched a land invasion of southern Lebanon in early August, 2006. The operation only ended when Israeli casualties on the ground mounted rapidly and the Israeli government pulled its troops back.

So what would be a reasonable and proportionate Turkish response to the recent attacks by the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), listed as a terrorist organization by the United States and most other Western countries, from northern Iraq into southeastern Turkey? More than forty Turkish civilians and soldiers have been killed in these attacks over the past two weeks, and a further eight Turkish soldiers were captured.

Well, it would be unreasonable for Turkey to bomb Iraq, where the PKK's bases are, for any more than one month. It would be quite disproportionate for the Turkish Air Force to level more than a small part of Baghdad — say, 15,000 homes. Ideally, it should leave Baghdad alone and restrict itself to destroying some Kurdish-populated city in northern Iraq near Turkey's own border. Moreover, when the Turks do invade Iraq on the ground, they should restrict themselves to the northern border strip where the PKK's bases are.

What's that? Washington is asking Turkey to show restraint and not attack Iraq at all? Even after the Kurdish terrorists killed or kidnapped all those Turkish people? Could it be that Turkish lives are worth less than Israeli lives?

Never mind. At least the United States officially classes the PKK as a terrorist organization and refuses to let its officials have any contact with it. But what's this? There is a parallel terrorist organization called the Party for Free Life in Kurdistan (PJAK), essentially a branch office of the PKK, also based in northern Iraq, which carries out attacks into the adjacent Kurdish-populated region of Iran, and the United States does not condemn the PJAK? It even sends its officials to have friendly chats with the PJAK terrorists? How odd!

The PJAK's leader, Rahman Haj-Ahmadi, paid an unofficial visit to Washington last summer. One of his close associates, Biryar Gabar, claims to have "normal dialogue" with US officials, according to a report last Tuesday in the New York Times — and the American military spokesman in Baghdad, Cmdr. Scott Rye, issued a carefully structured nondenial saying that "The consensus is that US forces are not working with or advising the PJAK."

Biryar Gabar also said that PJAK fighters have killed at least 150 Iranian soldiers and officials in the past three months. That's a lot more people than the PKK have killed in Turkey in the same time, and yet neither Washington nor any other Western country has expressed sympathy for Iran. Could it be that Iranian lives are worth even less than Turkish lives?

And here's something even more peculiar. Iran, like Turkey, is already shelling Kurdish villages on the Iraqi side of the frontier that it suspects of sheltering or supplying the PKK/PJAK. How come President George W. Bush and Vice President Richard Cheney simply ignore these actions, when they have been working hard for the past year to build a case for attacking Iran? As Pat Buchanan noted on MSNBC's "Hardball" last week: "Cheney and Bush are laying down markers for themselves which they're going to have to meet. I don't see how."

The US military "assets" for an attack on Iran are all in place, so it can't be that. Maybe the delay means that Bush and Cheney are having difficulty in persuading the military professionals to go along with this hare-brained scheme. Most senior American military officers see an attack on Iran as leading to inevitable failure and humiliation for the United States, and the last thing the White House wants is a rash of US generals resigning in protest when it orders the attack.

On the other hand, Bush is still the commander-in-chief, and how many American generals resigned when he committed the somewhat lesser folly of invading Iraq? Only one, and he did it very quietly.

"Hezbollah, PKK and American Hypocrisy," by Gwynne Dyer. Arab News. October 30, 2007.

Dishonest Americans will turn a blind eye.

Honest Americans will seek to eliminate all hypocrisy in their hearts. They will see that the system designed by the American founding fathers is irreparable. It just cannot hold the new wine.

Iran is attacking the PJAK without the U.S. using that as a pretext to attack Iran. The reason is that the Iranians have plenty of proof and still have mundane rights under international law to defend themselves that the Bush administration isn't willing to deny. Remember, Russia and China are much more involved with Iran now than either was with Iraq. Iran attacking the PJAK as a pretext to attack Iran wouldn't afford Bush and Cheney even the ridiculously low level of plausible deniability they still seek. Russia and China would block it in the U.N. Many Europeans wouldn't go along either.

Bush and Cheney haven't been saying that Turkey hasn't been being attacked from Iraq by Kurds. They haven't said to Turkey that Turkey doesn't have a right to counter-attack. They've just been working to get Turkey not to attack for the sake of Israel's and the American neocon's grand plan (Greater Israel) in the region. Turkey can see through that though and will want some big compensation for holding back. If they aren't satisfied and do invade, think about that. Turkey would be invading a nation occupied by the U.S. Technically, the U.S. has an obligation to keep the peace in Kurdistan and to protect the Kurdish civilians even against Turkey.

This is the kind of mess George went in to cause. The more chaos that results, the better it will be in his mind. His neocons think that they'll get the area so angry that only a full-scale leveling will stop it. They'll put the whole region back to the Stone Age to get complete control and reduce the surplus population, as they define it.

When the Republicans stop even worrying about any so-called plausible deniability, you will know that the dictatorship is openly declaring itself as such. Then they'll have to contend with Americans radicalized into once again being militant revolutionaries hearkening back to the founders fighting King George of England and "all's fair in love and war." What an utterly hardhearted direction to take the nation and the world.


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  • Tom Usher

    About Tom Usher

    Employment: 2008 - present, website developer and writer. 2015 - present, insurance broker. Education: Arizona State University, Bachelor of Science in Political Science. City University of Seattle, graduate studies in Public Administration. Volunteerism: 2007 - present, president of the Real Liberal Christian Church and Christian Commons Project.
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