SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD? TIME TO PROVE IT.

Around the world, there is a growing scientific consensus that our oceans are in crisis. Decades of destructive fishing practices and mismanagement have taken their toll on many of our fisheries. Three-quarters of all commercially valuable fish stocks are now exploited, overexploited or depleted. Worldwide, up to 90% of stocks of large predatory fish such as halibut, sharks, tuna and swordfish already have been fished away. According to a new study published this month in the journal Science, 96% of the world's oceans have been damaged by human activity. Researchers predict that global fisheries could collapse by the middle of this century.

RLCC: "Worldwide, up to 90% of stocks of large predatory fish such as halibut, sharks, tuna and swordfish already have been fished away." Think about that.

Fish Greenpeace says should not be purchased, sold, or consumed include the following:

Alaska Pollock

Atlantic Cod or Scrod

Atlantic Halibut (US and Canadian) (PDF)

Atlantic Salmon (wild and farmed)

Atlantic Sea Scallop

Bluefin tuna (PDF)

Big Eye Tuna

Chilean Sea Bass (also sold as Patagonia Toothfish) (PDF)

Greenland Halibut (also sold as Black halibut, Atlantic turbot or Arrowhead flounder)

Grouper (imported to the U.S.)

Hoki (also known as Blue Grenadier) (PDF)

Monkfish

Ocean Quahog

Orange Roughy (PDF)

Red Snapper

Redfish (also sold as Ocean Perch)

Sharks (PDF)

Skates and Rays

South Atlantic Albacore Tuna

Swordfish

Tropical Shrimp (wild and farmed)

Yellowfin Tuna

Originally from News on February 20, 2008, 5:00pm

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  • Tom Usher

    About Tom Usher

    Employment: 2008 - present, website developer and writer. 2015 - present, insurance broker. Education: Arizona State University, Bachelor of Science in Political Science. City University of Seattle, graduate studies in Public Administration. Volunteerism: 2007 - present, president of the Real Liberal Christian Church and Christian Commons Project.
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