SELFISHNESS USES LESS RECENTLY DEVELOPED/EVOLVED PORTIONS OF THE BRAIN: START THINKING WITH YOUR HIGHER BRAIN; DON'T BE A PREDATOR

I've been given to understand that the right parietal lobe is the back-top quarter of the brain. It is the region most active in selfishness. The frontal lobes sit in front of the parietal lobes and just behind the forehead. The temporal lobes are on either side of the head and below the frontal lobes and mainly above the temples. When the right parietal lobe is functioning most and the frontal and temporal lobes least, it is the sociopathic state (consciencelessness).

The frontal lobes are, among other things, where semantical understanding and memory reside. It is for word-and-symbol meanings and comprehension. It is the seat of consciousness. It is the seat of planning. The prefrontal cortex is a brain layer just before the frontal lobes. This is where self-control resides and where meaning is formed (connections are seen).

This is the highest part of the brain, the part that was last to develop, the part that set human beings apart from "lower" animals.

Abuse ruins this. Abuse shatters the mind. It causes physical damage. It is injurious. Abuse must be overcome. The fight-or-flight response must be corrected.

This doesn't mean that the parietal lobes are useless in the mundane. Spatial and abstract reasoning depend largely upon the parietal lobes. What this all means though is that the whole mind must be healed to work cooperatively.

http://universe-review.ca/R10-16-ANS.htm
http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/mind_brain/spirituality/

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  • Tom Usher

    About Tom Usher

    Employment: 2008 - present, website developer and writer. 2015 - present, insurance broker. Education: Arizona State University, Bachelor of Science in Political Science. City University of Seattle, graduate studies in Public Administration. Volunteerism: 2007 - present, president of the Real Liberal Christian Church and Christian Commons Project.
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