One-sided: "Charles Koch: I'm Fighting to Restore a Free Society - WSJ.com"

Look, unbridled capitalism isn't crony capitalism, but it leads to monopolies and eventually to one monopoly. Only the anti-trust efforts of government ensures that we are free of such monopolies. That's liberty too.

Now, maybe Charles Koch is a "good" businessman, meaning he knows how to run a business, a very huge business, and isn't any worse environmentally or labor-wise than others in his industries; but that doesn't let him off the philosophical/economic hook for his anti-mixed-economy, extreme-capitalist views.

The system he has in mind would not work without enslaving everyone under a private monopoly that for all intents and purposes, would end up being as an absolute monarchy: right back where we started from only worse because of all the technology we now have.

He's opposed to collectivization, but I like toll-free roads better than I like capitalist toll roads. I like free public parks. I like lots of collectivized things better than their privatized, for-toll counterparts. I see no reason why any billionaire should have anything against such public property unless he's a capitalist-monopolist at heart.

Frankly, we have way too much privatization. We need more free, public organizations. I'm for doing it entirely, as this blog makes very clear and why.

Mr. Koch, if you wish to defend yourself against my post, you are welcome to post a comment or even to request a blog post here. If you answer me somewhere else, let me know where to find it.

Charles Koch: I'm Fighting to Restore a Free Society - WSJ.com

Tom1

Tom Usher

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  • Tom Usher

    About Tom Usher

    Employment: 2008 - present, website developer and writer. 2015 - present, insurance broker. Education: Arizona State University, Bachelor of Science in Political Science. City University of Seattle, graduate studies in Public Administration. Volunteerism: 2007 - present, president of the Real Liberal Christian Church and Christian Commons Project.
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