Not reforming from within the current EU system: "No one expects the EU institutions to adopt our proposals, least of all us. All we want is for voters to see what could be done ...." ~ Yanis Varoufakis

I had written quite recently that I'm done with those trying to reform the EU from within. I still hold to that, but the following changes everything:

If I am right, it does not matter whether the EU is or isn’t reformable, but it does matter that we put forward concrete proposals on what we would do with EU institutions. Not utopian proposals but complete descriptions of what we would do this week, next month, in the next year, under the existing rules and with the existing instruments — how we would reassign the role of the awful European Stability Mechanism, reorient the ECB’s quantitative easing, and finance immediately, and without new taxes, a green transition and campaign against poverty.

Why such a detailed agenda? To show voters that there is an alternative, even within the rules designed by the establishment to further the interests of the top 1%. No one expects the EU institutions to adopt our proposals, least of all us. All we want is for voters to see what could be done, instead of what is being done, so that they can see through the establishment without turning to the xenophobic right. This is the only way the left can escape its confines and build abroad progressive coalition. [Source]

"No one expects the EU institutions to adopt our proposals, least of all us." That's the most important thing I've read from Yanis, ever.

DiEM25 is not, repeat, not reforming the EU from within. It is using the EU to prepare Europe for true integration and economic democracy. Now that, I can fully back!

Thanks, Yanis, for the clarification.

Some will be taken aback by Yanis' use of the term humanist. Yanis is not a Christian, but he is also for freedom of religion. When he says humanist, he means humanity doing for humanity what ought to be done. Many would call me a Christian humanist for that reason. Many would call Jesus a humanist too. Sadly, Marx became upset with Christianity rather than remaining a Christian and taking back the term. I believe he made the mistake of conflating Jesus with those who used Jesus' title of "Christ" in vain.

Tom Usher

About Tom Usher

Employment: 2008 - present, website developer and writer. 2015 - present, insurance broker. Education: Arizona State University, Bachelor of Science in Political Science. City University of Seattle, graduate studies in Public Administration. Volunteerism: 2007 - present, president of the Real Liberal Christian Church and Christian Commons Project.