Video Venezuela: Do they look like they're starving to you?: "Catia commune: 'Everything produced here goes to the community, what we do against the economic war'"

Eva K Bartlett:

"In Catia, western Caracas, a barrio of over 1 million people, mainly supporters of Chavez and and now overwhelmingly of President Maduro.

In the 1980s, people living here weren't even on the map of public planning agency, so they didn't get any public services, no water, no electricity, no medical services.

That changed under Chavez.

Poverty is still a major issue in Venezuela, prime factors being the US long economic war, and sanctions, against the country, but also the practises of opposition supporting suppliers, jacked up food prices, hyperinflation.

Visiting the Fabricio Ojeda commune, I met Venezuelans enthusiastically talking about their rabbit breeding project aimed at enabling households to be self-sufficient in affordable proteins as well as cash, and their array of outdoor beds and plastic roofed greenhouses.

In 2016, they produced 17 tons, sold in the community at between 30-50% lower than average market price.

A spokesperson of the commune explained:

“This was built in 2011. Everything produced here goes to the community. So far this year, we've already produced 2 tons of food, in spite of some difficulties: roof is deteriorated and largely missing on this greenhouse, electricity outage meaning we don't have water for the moment. But we're confident we'll move beyond this attack, we're getting water in now."

Another spokesperson:

"All this is thanks to the local commune. We're trying to achieve self sustainability of this produce, for the community. This is what we're doing against the economic war."

"In Catia, western Caracas, a barrio of over 1 million people, mainly supporters of Chavez and and now overwhelmingly of President Maduro.

In the 1980s, people living here weren't even on the map of public planning agency, so they didn't get any public services, no water, no electricity, no medical services.

That changed under Chavez.

Poverty is still a major issue in Venezuela, prime factors being the US long economic war, and sanctions, against the country, but also the practises of opposition supporting suppliers, jacked up food prices, hyperinflation.

Visiting the Fabricio Ojeda commune, I met Venezuelans enthusiastically talking about their rabbit breeding project aimed at enabling households to be self-sufficient in affordable proteins as well as cash, and their array of outdoor beds and plastic roofed greenhouses.

In 2016, they produced 17 tons, sold in the community at between 30-50% lower than average market price.

A spokesperson of the commune explained:

“This was built in 2011. Everything produced here goes to the community. So far this year, we've already produced 2 tons of food, in spite of some difficulties: roof is deteriorated and largely missing on this greenhouse, electricity outage meaning we don't have water for the moment. But we're confident we'll move beyond this attack, we're getting water in now."

Another spokesperson:

"All this is thanks to the local commune. We're trying to achieve self sustainability of this produce, for the community. This is what we're doing against the economic war."

Tom Usher

About Tom Usher

Employment: 2008 - present, website developer and writer. 2015 - present, insurance broker. Education: Arizona State University, Bachelor of Science in Political Science. City University of Seattle, graduate studies in Public Administration. Volunteerism: 2007 - present, president of the Real Liberal Christian Church and Christian Commons Project.